May 13, 2014

Age, rust and dust: Tutorial, printie and a project for you!

Good day folks!

So lets just jump in shall we?

I am going to show you a few techniques to try on objects to create a aged, antique or rusted look.

Now while you don't have to think about total destruction or apocalypse, maybe just a dab of rush on a watering can, bike, bucket or maybe you will go so far as to create a tin shed for your spring potting!

I have created this very basic wheel barrow pattern for you to use as you wish, add to combine with other things: You can use the pattern in card stock or use it as a trace pattern for wood or cereal box cardboard as I did. I have given you a doubled pattern if you want to just use the card stock. Obviously you can use a pre-purchased assembled object and do the same painting technique if you wish.
 
:Right click open in a new window: Save this pattern or you can print it at full page:
 
If you are going to use the pattern as a trace make sure to mark your fold lines with a bit of a line:
After you cut and fold you can assemble this with glue. You might have to trim the sides a bit since I did not spend a lot of time rounding corners.
As you see I put on the legs first and then put the handle bars between the legs as support.
You can go directly to putting on a base coat with paint if you like. I happen to use this textured spray-paint lightly on the surface as it added a little more dimension to it and firmed up the board.
I then coated the surface with a steel metallic paint. You can use whatever metallic color you like but the point of metallic paint is the sheen. Then the rust will be a mat or textured mat color.
If you choose a classic color then do a gloss paint, I did the other side as a red gloss just as a example.
 
The mix for your rust is going to be all mat colors: reddish brown paint, maybe a tad bit of dark orange. You can add sand to one part, you can add some cinnamon to another and also keep a dab of dry cinnamon to test out.
 
Take a look at rusted objects online. Your going to want to do tiny dry stippled patterns of rust along the lines of your object. Underneath where it would touch or rub surfaces. Along the edges.
 
As you can see I added different dabs of my sand mixed paint, my dry cinnamon powder and mat paint, with the texture....well you can see what you can do with..just paper and paint here!
 
Notice the sheen or shiny parts and the mat rust spots..yes..that is just cardboard!
again the classic coat color is the same..shiny spots and mat
 
So have fun with the pattern try different things with it yourself maybe add some flowers inside ;P.
 
I wanted to show you that..of course you can purchase miniatures.. I also encourage you to try using that mini eye and paint techniques to really create something unique and ..dare I say use them scraps!!
 
Here is a little shot of the project I am working on.. The techniques I showed you can make things as simple as cereal boxes and corrugated cardboard turn from paper to metal and weathered siding:
 
Yes...cereal boxes..and cardboard..paint..glue...sand
 
Try it out for yourself!!
 
_________________________________________________
 
Ps..I have to show you this!! This is a real shot of a strawberry I got the other day...I don't think I have ever seen one this big before.
 
Any questions on the painting, feel free to ask and I will elaborate or explain further ;)
~J 

30 comments:

  1. Thanks Jane, your timing is impeccable. The House I'm working on now needs a rusty corrugated tin roof. I've been trying to figure out how to create rust and you've just saved the day! Great easy to follow tutorial. Once again Thank-You :-)

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    1. Oh perfect then! I cant wait to see you fantastic work!

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  2. es un tutorial genial, gracias por compartirlo, esa plantilla me ira de perlas,
    esa fresa es inmensa

    besitos

    Mari

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    1. I hope you can use it ;) ~J

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  3. es un tutorial genial, gracias por compartirlo, esa plantilla me ira de perlas,
    esa fresa es inmensa

    besitos

    Mari

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  4. Thanks Jane, Im working on an outhouse and I need some rust :) *giggle*

    Hugs
    Marisa

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    1. Oh that will look fantastic!

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  5. Thank you Jane for a great tutorial. I too, don't think I ever saw a strawberry that large. This one is
    amazing. I wonder if it's sweet as the small ones.
    Hugs, Drora

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    1. It is perfectly sweet! They tasted wonderful ;)

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  6. Hello Jane,
    what kind of fertilizer do they use to get such big strawberries?!
    Your techniques are amazing. The rust especially blows me away. They look so realistic...both color and texture! Bravo my friend.
    Big hug,
    Giac

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    1. Haha.. I don't know what kind but it sure seemed like a lot of sh.... *cackle*

      Thanks for the kind words hon, and congratulations on your article!
      hugs~J

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  7. Un tutorial fantástico, gracias por compartirlo y que aproveche la fresa, es enorme. Besos

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  8. Thank you for this awesome tutorial! I would have never guessed cinnamon. Some people say not to use real food products in mini making (I guess because of bugs?), but I don't see bugs getting to it with the paint. I will definitely have to try this technique on something. That strawberry is incredible. I hope Birgit doesn't let Fluby see it or he might pass out with excitement. ;-)
    Hugs,
    Lisa :-)

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    1. I was thinking of Fluby too, Birgit may have a bear on his way to USA by now... ;)

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  9. Thank you Jane for the fantastic tutorial. Another thing to go on my to do list lol. Your items are amazing and look sooo real just paper wow. That is one BIG strawberry it looks yummy.
    Hugs Maria

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  10. Nice tutorial with your usual fun, enthusiastic delivery! Thank you so much! I'll come back to this post when I want to make a garden shed with tin roof--that sounds so fun to me. Interesting variety of strawberry--looks like a large California strawberry--but that's the biggest one I've ever seen! Hope you really savored it! ;-) xo Jennifer

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  11. Nunca había visto una fresa tan grande!!!!!
    Gracias por el tutoria.l Guardaré la información, seguro que me vendrá bien.

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  12. Thanks for the tutorial Jane. I haven't really had a go at rusting or aging anything yet. You make it look easy. I will definitely have a go and create a little scene. I think it could get addictive and I might end up with a number of rusty miniature items.

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  13. Thank you for wonderful tutorial!!! Kiss!

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  14. I could need one of these for my greenhouse =) Thanks for sharing, I might have to try this soon, but I'm working on dragons now, someone just sent me a lot of inspiration for than project you know... ;)
    That strawberry, wow! Did you eat it? My experience of strawberries say that the smaller they are, the better they taste, am I wrong?? Was this one really good? =)
    Hannah

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    1. Ahhhh dragons! Yes keep working on them..oooo I wanna see!

      The strawberry was surprisingly sweet for its gigantic size ;)

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  15. Thanks for the fantastic tutorial.
    The strawberry is very big!

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  16. Thank you for this fantastic tutorial... I've saved this post to have it at hand when I need it... And I'm glad Fluby isn't around to see your post, that would have caused me loads of trouble. Believe me - it's not easy with a strawberrry addicted flutterybeary in the house... ;O)

    Hugs
    Birgit

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  17. Wow! So realistic looking. I'll have to try it. Thanks so much for sharing :)

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  18. Grazie per avere condiviso questo tutorial!

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  19. Thank you very much for this tutorial! I am sure I will need it soon because I start to make a farmhouse in 1:7 for Nemus´aunt Josephine and I think in a farmhouse are always much old rosty things!
    This strawberry is a dream for all strawberry lovers... just for Birgit it is a nightmare... even if Flutterby ever will find this post... I wonder if it will be a good idea for Birgit to save this post...
    Hugs
    Melli

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  20. Grazie Jane per il tutorial. La carriola è stata molto usata e l'impressione della ruggine è perfetta!
    Un caro saluto.Manu

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  21. Jane, you are a WONDER WOMAN in disguise! I think that this tutorial is BRILLIANT and you are a Genius!!!! I would NEVER have thought of using Cinnamon for rust... how clever of you and the sand in the paint is a great way to get that extra bit of texture. You are on a Cinnamon Roll my dear. And I love It! :D

    and that strawberry is scary
    elizabeth

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  22. Great tutorial. I love how you added so much dimension and realism with your paint and rust technique.

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